Link

It’s an Honour to be representing the team at Go Auto Southtown Dodge in these walkaround videos!

Big thanks to the video production team at Strathcom Media. The way they stitch together my speech and make me sound do much better is GREATLY appreciated.

You wanna know how to sell a lot of Cars?

I was talking with a guy at work, let’s call him Dodger. He’s an older guy in the biz, been in a few years. He has that Golden Retriever type temperament.

Some guys are just old war Hero’s that have this cock swagger of James Bond thing goin on – which is cool – but sometimes you get some real pieces of information from this guy, delivered in a way you almost feel obligated to respect. Yet never doubt it because your guy says he’s spot on.

I was talking about how I don’t know what to say when people remark on my sales throughout the day. I don’t see anything special. I’m just a 7 or 8 car guy, just twice as stressed out about making money, who works double the hours.

New people sometimes ask how I did a little above average or got the hang of it a litter quicker than normal. All I really can say is that I really wanted to. I just wanted to get past that awkward moment where you’re new and get to be good so I listened to everything the best had to say. I realized that there was probably a ton of ways to get it accidentally right, but from owning a business I learned that ‘accidentally right’ is just laziness. I would see it as laziness from my staff.

If anyone had anything to say that might help me sell more cars, it was the guys who have to go home every day after trying to teach people how to do what they know to be as second nature.

So I tried to listen to them and know WHY they want me to act a certain way, and what mistakes they learned from not doing it that way. Kind of like learning how to not get hurt on a rig. There was both body and mind tricks to make sure you didn’t catch yourself in a tight dangerous spot on a worksite, so it’s kind of like how to not get yourself into a bind in a sale, surely this could be beneficial to me.

Then I heard someone say “tell em what you’re gonna do, then do what you say you’re going to do, then tell em what ya did” and that made sense.

We all know it’s the right thing to say, to pronounce that we care, and that we will check in on them, and that we trust this to be the best vehicle for them.

But it’s another thing to actually do it.

I realized how big this was, to ACTUALLY give a fuck. If you could just honestly, try to really appreciate and give a fuck that these people parted with 40 or 50 THOUSAND dollars and 5-7 years of their LIVES, to a decision they make THAT DAY. When they go through that, they need to know you give a fuck like a doctor has to give a fuck when you’re on a table bleeding to death.

I honestly can’t WAIT to call my customers in the snow and hear how awesome their cars are in the snow compared to the last one.

To hear how yes. Their car IS still running great and how helpful this has been for the family. How YES they are happy still and don’t need another one. Because the minute they aren’t happy with it, they will be waiting for my call to say;
NO! This vehicle is no longer good enough”, I can get them a new one right away.

I think if there is any kind of advantage, it’s not the words, or that I’m smarter, or that I have some kind of “gift”. I’m just an average guy that’s stressing more, because I really worry about how happy my customers are……. And I think my guests can sense that? Maybe it’s just a little extra openness and letting them know I really actually want them to be happy, because you can appreciate the money they are spending, and understand it’s not about the profit, or the payment, it’s not about how much they want to see for their trade in.

It’s about you GETTING, that this is a huge decision for them, and it’s just your day job. But that if you actually give a fuck, they might pick up on that.

Rolling over the Curb

So I am just finishing up the 60th day straight I have worked without a day off at this new car sales job.

After reading the first 90 days. I am pretty sure I need to keep working another 30 days but now I get one day off every two weeks to regain energy, and I know why.

The Slump. If you completely immerse yourself in something for 8 hours a day for 30 days, you start to notice how much better or easier that thing has become. By day 45 you almost start to feel that you are the best that there is. At this point you will begin to think that you are in fact so naturally talented that you can begin to alter the process. Then you get into a slump.

So here at day 6, I find myself on the end of a 4 day slump where I have only sold two cars, one was to a situation where there was no way they were getting financed but sometimes they work miracles happen so it was at least worth putting into the hopper. The other, a sale that seemed to just go way too easy, and would probably turn into a crazy lady the next day demanding her money. Like a girl angry after a one night stand.

Its taken me those 4 days to figure whats going on, its a slump, where you lose your groove, and suddenly begin to get frustrated and confused, even impatient and resentful.

I hit that wall today, I found myself trying to skip through the emotional process for people to buy a car. Its a loss of respect for them. Which is when all of a sudden you lose what makes you genuine, and try to make up for it by just essentially “Telling them” what to think, and not helping them begin to feel comfortable to make their own decisions, and to help facilitate their choice.

If that seems a little convoluted…

“It’s like walking up to a girl and saying;
‘Hey uhhhh… I know that I’m good looking enough for you, wanna just skip this whole courtship process and go bang right now. My place?’

IT WOULDN’T WORK!

Yes, of course I am sure some of the time it works, but as far as closing ratio goes, you can’t bet on that. You have to give them the emotional experience they expect. If you alter that process, you will stray. If you lose respect for their own needs for a comfortable rate to trust someone, they will very rarely buy.

I had that happen to a guy today, who wanted a lifted truck, and I totally just tried skipping the process basically just trying to close them on the parking lot, in essence skipping steps and having it cost me the proper rapport needed to sell.

This is where the saying “back to the basics” comes from. You have to go back to respecting the process and trusting yourself to know the right points to transition from step to step seamlessly, so that you never seem threatening and always make them feel comfortable. That is what makes it so you have a high percentage closing rate in this business, its an utmost adherence to a process and becoming very good at repeating it without the emotional temptation to skip steps affecting you. That is just as much a skill as knowing product knowledge. The better you can get at that, the better you can get at sales. When you are new, and struggling with the process, it’s closing that you are uncomfortable with. Once you figure that out, and have the process figured out, it is staying emotionally and intellectually aware of the need for people to naturally develop trust and rapport to keep yourself in line.

By month three I hope to be learning what a top level sales person is struggling with.

 

What it’s like to buy a Car?

I want to know what it was like when you last purchased a vehicle?

I will be selling Chrysler Dodge and Jeep in Edmonton at Southtown Chrysler very shortly, and I would like to know what it was like for people when they purchased a car, or even went shopping. I myself have bought 3 brand new cars and one used car from a dealership, with a variety of experiences. I would like to hear yours.

What did you like about your car buying experiences? What didn’t you like? What has it been like after owning your car? This information is so widely available online, but I would like to see any unique opinions from people close to me.

Please Share. You can do so in a comment on this blog, or e-mail me privately at AdamSand@me.com